Posted by: ritagone | February 18, 2015

Guest Blog

I’m at a CA conference in Colorado this week, so, with her permission, I’m re-blogging my friend Amy Downing’s wonderful recent blog post. Enjoy!!

The Lemon Tree That Wasn’t

Share

I have this potted lemon tree that I planted in our house when we moved in about four years ago. I was so excited to have lemons. Last year I believe it produced one lemon, but this spring, my lemon tree has produced seven lemons. (Wait, can I say “spring” at the beginning of February? You can if you live in Southern California. Sorry, rest of the world.)

I know I needed to pick them but they looked so amazing and cute and yellow. And there were a couple extra big lemons, but they were slightly green on the underside so I decided to let them get a little more sunshine inside of them before pulling them off to be sacrificed in lemon bars.

This past week a friend came by and walked past my beautiful little lemon tree and said, “oh, lemons and grapefruits—how yummy.”

I looked at her and said, “Oh, no. just lemons. Aren’t those two lemons so big?”

Her reply: “Those are grapefruits.”

And then I investigated more closely, which was not easy because it was dark outside. But when I studied the plant, I saw that the tiny little lemons seemed to be coming from one trunk, and the “grapefruits” were growing from a different one.

Wow. This picture really makes the grapefruit look obviously grapefruity. In person, it just was not that apparent. Really.
WOW. THIS PICTURE REALLY MAKES THE GRAPEFRUITS LOOK OBVIOUSLY GRAPEFRUITY. IN PERSON, IT JUST WAS NOT THAT APPARENT. REALLY.

It explained a lot. Well, it explained why my lemons looked like grapefruits. I’m still not sure how a grapefruit tree got in with my lemon stalk, though when you buy your fruit trees from Home Depot, you’ve got to allow for some error, I imagine.

It made me think of where else in my life I have made preconceptions that I could be totally . . . (gasp!) wrong about. And not silly things like mistaking a grapefruit for a lemon, but things that affect how we view each other and ourselves.

I never considered the possibility of drawing or cartooning for myself. I was always a stick figure kind of girl. But over the past few years, a cartoonist in me is starting to grow, and whether I’ll ever be officially labeled a cartoonist, in my heart I am. Isn’t that what matters?

My dad has never thought of himself as a reader. In fact, growing up, I don’t think I ever saw him read a book or a magazine. (Though in the bathroom I would find remnants of a newspaper, so I know he COULD read.) However, this year, he said he got bored with television and picked up a book. He’s basically had one glued in his hands ever since.  He commented that he gets sad when he thinks of all the years wasted not reading. (Hear that, son Tate?)

The difficulty with hidden treasures in our lives is that it often takes someone else to point them out to us (like the dear grapefruit). Even with cartooning, if I had not had a mentor teacher point out my strengths, I may have never been bold enough to actually include them in my columns.

Think about the preconceptions you’ve lived with, whether it’s been for a lifetime or just a few months. They can blind you to trying new things or paralyze you from stepping out in boldness.

Today is the day to seek out those grapefruits hiding among your lemon tree.

Isn't "sheesh" the greatest interjection? I really can't believe it didn't make School House Rock's Interjection Song. Sheesh!
ISN’T “SHEESH” THE GREATEST INTERJECTION? I REALLY CAN’T BELIEVE IT DIDN’T MAKE SCHOOL HOUSE ROCK’S INTERJECTION SONG. SHEESH!

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Categories

%d bloggers like this: